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conducted by our c.i.a. principally in pakistan, afghanistan and somalia that will be our focus in a few moments. filmmaker and activist robert greenwald is back from pakistan where he tried determine if strikes which washington says are targeted on terrorists are making the u.s. any safer or rather creating a new generation of anti--american militants. now according to pakistani foreign minister, hina rabbani khar, things are making it worse. >> you're creating a thousand more people who will go in the ranks of al-qaeda and the taliban because they feel that when civilians die and illegal activity happens in another territory, it is a hostile one and it is something which has reaction. >> john: we'll have more on drone warfare in a moment. first for the latest on the algerian hostage crisis, we're joined by carlo munoz staff writer, following the story. thank you for following the story tonight. >> thank you for having me. >> john: what is the latest? they say the assault is over but apparently some prisoners are still, in fact, being held. >> that's what -- sort of where the situation
is back from pakistan to determine if strikes are strickly targeted targeted on terrorists are making americans safer or creating a new generation ofant i-american militants. >> you are creating 1,000 morminds in people who will go in the ranks of the al qaeda and taliban and feel illegal activity happens it is a hostile one and something that has reaction. >> we will have more on the dron warfare in a moment. first on the crisis we are joined by the staff writer for defense and national defense for the hill. >> thank you for having me. >> what is the latest? officials say the assault is over but some prisoners are still being held. >> that's where the situation stands right now. you mentioned alger an special forces and the numbers regarding the hostages still on the -- at the facility, it is just as murky as the numbers coming out as who were killed and who escaped. some reports have said as many as two americans are still on the facility under lock and key by the militants who are there. again, reports vary. >> are
personally intervened to resolve a diplomatic crises and difficult places from pakistan and afghanistan to egypt and sudan. and i really look forward to working with you on some of the challenging issues as it faces the country in the world but we start back to something and number of senators have referred to in your opening statement which you said. i just want to say i've been deeply encouraged by your response to senator shaheen's comments and senator rubio. we are sadly foreign commercial service woefully underrepresented and wherever opportunity to advocate for american business and american values and as you know i chaired to the hearings on this. we are about to come out with a report from the subcommittee and i would be interested as the first of my several questions and how you see has successfully competing with china which has a rapidly growing footprint across africa in both economic opportunities and in our differing values agenda and what that makes doing for and how you would address that as secretary e and senator coons were a terrific team with respect to africa and i
is among eight people killed by a u.s. drone strike in pakistan. as you probably know the obama administration has stepped up the use of drones overseas to target suspected terrorists. president obama's nomination of john brennan to be the next cia director suggests that trend is likely to continue. brennan, a strong proponent of drones as the president's chief counterterrorism advisor. for more on how the u.s. drone program works let's get to chief washington correspondent james rosen. he is live for us at the state department. james? >> reporter: jon, good morning. this program presents a consistent headache for the diplomats in this building and who must frequently contend with complaints from afghan and pakistani officials who say these drones all too often wind up killing innocent civilians instead of terrorists the drone program is one of the national security initiatives that president obama inherited from the bush administration and one which the current commander-in-chief has dramatically expanded. for all his criticism of president bush during the 2008 campaign over hi
, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he has been to egypt and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator has a colin -- it is what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administration. i know that john kerry cares deeply about our country and our national security. i know he believes in
and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sedan. -- sudan. historians will be judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy at much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i want to ask john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to eject. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he has been to egypt and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator has -- it is what we do. we fight for people back,. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administration. i know that john kerry cares deeply about our c
policy board and has served as a senior adviser as recently as 2011 for afghanistan and pakistan to the late richard holbrooke, former munk debater. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasser. [applause] when you think of provocative conversation on a big foreign policy challenges of the day, you have to think about our next debater. his flagship global affairs overam on cnn is seen in 200 countries worldwide but he is anything but a talking head on cable tv. he rights a highly respected column for "the washington post" and is the editor-at-large of "time" magazine. his numerous best selling books include "the post-american world" and "the future of freedom." please welcome back to the munk debate stage, broadcaster and journalist, fareed zukaria. we are just moments from getting our debate underway but before we hear from opening statements, once again, i'm going to need this audience's assistance as the night goes on to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remarks and that we move forward as a debate together so you will see this countdown clock
three questions. one is afghanistan, the sec is pakistan. with regard to afghanistan, i wanted to ask you about the first question relates to president karzai and the leches ahead of them. when he was here just a couple of weeks ago, i had the chance to visit with him in leader mcconnel's office and a number of senators as well. and to ask him directly about the elections and ask him about my second question. but i wanted to get your sense of where you see those lexes going. what efforts you can undertake to make sure that they are free and fair because they've been, i think, central to the next chapter in this transition. i just wanted to comment on that. the second question as it relates to afghanistan is one that senator boxer raised and her work on this has been exemplary, on women and girls and in particular, i have a -- an amendment that we got through the national defense authorization act which would require both state and defense to file a report on the efforts to promote the security of afghan women and girls just by way of itemization monitoring and responding to changes in
libya and egypt and syria and pakistan. we are talking about a world that is changing and is less responsive to u.s. pressure and u.s. military power and diplomacy. that changes something that chuck hagel is aware of and he has well-formed views on. at the heart of that view is that power should be diffused away from the american military and plates and other power centers around the world and that idea itself is controversial. president obama agrees with that and many in congress do not. host: the former senator gave an interview with his former state paper, "the lincoln journal star" he said his critics have distorted his views. guest: it is unusual for a to give any interviews at all but he has faced a much criticism that he wanted to get one opening salvo out there and that is what he did. he basically said that he will have a chance to correct the record during his confirmation hearing. we should note from that interview that he is not backing down from any of his positions. he is not saying he no longer believes in the things that he believed in that were so controversial. h
national security goal. we'd like to be able to also keep an eye on pakistan's western provincess from that area as well and continue some of the operations that as you know we've been conducting from afghanistan to go after terrorists there too. those are our core interests. everything else is in the category of nice to v. unfortunately you can't necessarily go after a terrorist unless you help the afghan government stay on its feet and that means you've got to help them politically, economically, with their own army, and if you're trying to rush out by 2014, by the end of next year, and pull out everybody except, you know, a few seals and delta force commandos the afghans may not have the help they need to hold their own country together and your ultimate goals may not be achievable. that is where there are a lot of issues that wind up getting brought here. one last one is the afghan presidential elections next year. hamid karzai is supposed to step down in about 15 months. i think he will. but there is a big question about who is going to replace him, how much he will try to influen
at the instability in pakistan. this is a real danger we have to think about in the future. if we ignore them, that is a prescription for getting more americans killed. host: i want to get your reaction to what the secretary of state had to say yes today. here's what she had to say. [video clip] guest: i think you would hear the same from the intelligence community or dod. the work that was done in afghanistan and pakistan, they have taken out a whole cadre of leadership. people have migrated back to other parts of the world who are affiliates, part of the jihad syndicate. they are extremists and have designs on overthrowing existing governments, control and territory. there has been the decimation of al qaeda in the afghanistan- pakistan region, we have to contend with the wannabes and the affiliate's going forward. host: any reaction? guest: there has been a loss of capacity on the part of al qaeda central and pakistan. because osama bin laden is dead, that doesn't mean allocate it is dead -- it does mean al qaeda is dead. they are very much alive. they have migrated. they are now seeing a
public and successful diplomatic interventions in afghanistan, pakistan and sudan. i think one day historians will judge his senate years in temperatures terms of his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many recognize senator ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, john has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or government but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said, it's the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he's been working quietly to help a father from newton, massachusetts, colin bauer, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times he's been to egypt since then and every time colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator here has a colin bauer. it's what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bend over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific brid
. iraq, afghanistan and pakistan so every country in the world we are under the kind of contracting world that i think do interfere with our capacity to get the best deal, particularly when it comes to security that we should in these countries where the threats unfortunately are going to always be with us. >> should we look to extend that to the drc come to somalia? >> there was an article i think in one of the newspapers today that went into some detail. basically years has started. federal law required the state department to select the cheapest rather than the best contractor to provide local card services at its embassies abroad and there's that old saying you get what you pay for and this lowest price provision started off in 1990, but it has just stayed with us and i would respectfully request that this committee would take a hard look at it. you can't do a total lifting of it for everybody at least look at the highest post where obviously we did it for iraq and afghanistan and pakistan and the countries that you are naming our countries that i think would fall into that category.
's elementary. >>> gunman in northwest pakistan ambushed a van and killed five pakistani teachers and two health workers. they were working for a private pakistani group who was targeted for their anti-polio work. militants have accused them of spying for the u.s. and extremists have launched attacks in opposition to female education. >>> more than 60 people were killed in a stampede after a fireworks show and 200 others hurt. many were children and teenagers. thousands were leaving the stadium when the crowd surged forward, crushing dozens of people. >>> and there is new legal action in the wake of the jerry sandusky scandal at penn state. the governor there says he intends to sue the ncaa over sanctions that it slapped on the school. those sanctions, including $60 million fine, which finances the national campaign against child abuse, apparently some pennsylvania politicians don't like state taxpayer money going to other states. they think they should stay within pennsylvania. >>> new evidence has surfaced from the nation's most famous family feud. excavators found bullets believed to be from
diplomatic interventions in afghanistan, pakistan, and sudan. i think one day historians will judge his senate years in terms of his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many recognize senator ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, john has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or government but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said, it's the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he's been working quietly to help a father from newton, massachusetts, colin bower, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to egypt. john even called former president mubarak and had a screaming match with him about it. five times, he's been to egypt since then, and every time, colin has been at the top of his list in every meeting. every senator here has a colin bower. it's what we do. we fight for people back home. as secretary, john will understand that and bent over backwards to help us do that. he will be a terrific bridge from the hill to the administrati
the program perhaps in yemen, pakistan and other hot areas? >> suzanne, as you know, the principle architect, arguably, in yemen. he has traveled to yemen several times since the christmas day attempt in yemen to bring down u.s. flight over detroit. in the foundation that i work, new america foundation, in addition to cnn, we track that and we find that pakistan is going down rather dramatically, compared to 2010. it's expanding rapidly in yemen. one strike two years ago and there were probably -- at least 46 in this past year. so, he has presided over this policy. surely, it will be a topic at his nomination, whether you think of it negatively or positively. >> do you think it will have an impact by people who say this is not the way of doing things, going to war and going after terrorists? >> i doubt it, suzanne. i think there's broad support for this in general in washington and in congress. dealing most directly with the drones is satisfied in her own mind and has said publicly that the drones don't kill a lot of civilians, there's a great deal of caretaken with this. bro broadly speakin
and pakistan. ladies and gentlemen, dean vali nasr. [cheers and applause] now, when you think of provocative conversation on the big foreign policy challenge of the day you have to think about our next debater. his program on cnn is seen in over 200 countries worldwide but he's anything but a talking head on tv. he writes a column for "the washington post" and is the edit or "time" magazine. please welcome back to the munk debate stage journalist fareed zakaria. [cheers and applause] now we're moments from getting our debate under way but before we hear opening statements, once again, i need this audience assist answer to make sure our debaters stay on time in terms of their opening and closing remark and we move forward as a debate together. so you will see this countdown clock, this clock appear. when it reaches zero applaud. this will let our debaters know that their time is over for their opening and closing statements. before we kick off the debate let's see how the 3,000 people gathered today voted on our resolution that the world cannot tolerate iran with nuclear weapons. let's see th
and japan? i'm not sure about the muslim brotherhood aid but on pakistan that's been a big issue, both republicans and depps have said, we need to pare back that aid to pakistan. senator rand paul has been pushing that. others like senator john mccain say, we can't just cut them off. foreign aid is very important if we want to get them to do what we want them to do and foster democracy. host: before we let you go here, we're going to take another phone cull, but tell us the fresh minnesota class, some names and faces people should be looking out for, people who might make a name for themselves in the 113th? guest: one is senator tim kaine, he beat george allen in the election, a former governor, he's close to president obama. he was almost picked as vice president. obama and kain talked about him running in the senate, then he ended up winning. that's a democrat to watch. you have to watch the democrats in the senate. elizabeth warren won a huge battle with senator scott broun. -- scott brown. how is she going to operate? the financial industry is a little nervous about elizabeth warre
mission or return to pakistan? joining us now is the president of act for america, and the author bridgette gabriel. >> good morning, just to recap, let's tell malala's story again. she has been a champion for years of girls education in pakistan. she wants equal rights. she had a blog she spoke out about what was like being a young girl in the swat valley in pakistan, for all of that targeted tore the for the taliban and pulled over her school bus as she was on the way home from school and shot her in the head. miraculously, she survived, thanks to the great work of some pakistan and british doctors. she's now out of the hospital. what's the update on malala and what's next for her? >> she is out of the hospital and her father got a job in britain so her family will remain in britain, where she will be a little bit safer. they will have a little bit of security. but her life, it's going to be an uphill battle trying to protect ser he have from now on because she has become a symbol of freedom to many women in the islamic world and this is why she is he' going to remain a target a
extent pakistan is playing a role in these conversations. >> reporter: that's a good question. obviously pakistan will have to play a significant role. we're trying to get more information on that as we go forward. having been in pakistan just more than a year ago for the death of osama bin laden, the challenges that exist there are as great as any, especially given waziristan and the areas where the two countries border, but also those avenues for the u.s. to be able to receive all of the munitions that it needs and its supply lines so pakistan will clearly be critical in terms of the u.s. conversation going forward. >> steve rattner? >> so chuck, just back to guns for a second. any guesses yet on what the shape of an obama package would look like and when it would come? >> well, it seems -- first of all, they said it's going to be in the state of the union. that's number one. the second is that it would -- you know, there seems to be that they're going around -- they want to push something on the magazines. push more on this mental health check aspect. i think they're going to throw th
became disenchanted with the government and military of pakistan we cut off military assistance to the pakistani military and that led to a very negative consequences. so while some of these choices are very difficult, i'm inclined in the direction of greater, rather than lesser engagement. i don't think there is any point in just wiping our hands of these situations. lou: and, you talked about declining powers. does the obama administration's intelligence council in a new report that i just referred to, talks abouted day which the united states will no longer be a superpower but so-called first among equals. they project the date is somewhere around 2030. your thoughts and reckoning on the date and whether or not you agree with that, if you will, not decline, ascension of other powers? >> right. i certainly think that since the financial crisis back in 2007 and 2008, there has been a tendency to write us down, if you will. you think many of those assessments have been unduly pessimistic. i think even down right wrong at times. we're still the most powerful economy in the world.
pakistan the girl shot in the head by the taliban has been released from a british hospital. officials say she is strong and recovering well, so she will have to be readmitted next month for another round of surgery to rebuild her skull. as we told you, she was shot in the head by muslim extremists for promoting groth and education in her own contry. she will live with their parents and o brothers in the u.k. was a continues to receive treatment good news. meanwhile, the jobs report showing the slight growth. not really moving the economic neil. presence dollar an american enterprise institute and former consultanto the treasury department and steve son, president of capital public affairs and a former labor department official. all-starith you. where can i get -- what you make of this report? >> 455,000, which was the jobs increases, the average for the past couple of years. what is really sriking about this is this is the best we will e for a while. gerri: what? >> yeah. normally at the start of the year we're looking at big stimulus. last year payroll tax cut help fr the fed. on average
by pakistani authorities in pakistan. others were arrested in thailand by the police. you had nashiri who was arrested in to buy another arrested in somalia. the notion that we have to have the special forum that has battlefield conditions is a great smokescreen for this second-rate process that says more about us than about the people we are trying to bring before us. another important piece is the issue of torture. the senate select committee on intelligence completed their report recently and you probably saw john mccain and dianne feinstein said the report concludes torture did not work. they say it was a stain on our reputation. it is important that that report is declassified to the public in light of "zero dark 30." it is about the killing of osama bin laden bin laden. i think the movie will do for torture with jaws did for sharks. it will become the public perception of reality and it is a lie. i think that moving makes it doubly important for the senate select committee to report -- to get the report declassified so the public can have a debate on the truth and not this hollywood
was nearly identical to the u.s. drone campaign in pakistan and this is threat more evidence al qaeda followers yemen new base of operations, jon? >> jon: cath rib herrige in washington tonight. thank you. truly shocking. that's what the united nations is calling the latest estimate of the death toll in syria's civil war. activists tell us this video shows a new air strike today north of the capital damascus. they say this is video of an attack on a gas station outside damascus that killed or wounded dozens of people. fox news cannot confirm those reports or verify any of the video. the united nations now estimates the uprising has killed more than 60,000 people. and u.n. officials say more than half a million syrians are now refugees. a controversial leader dealing with precarious. whatever happens could have a major impact on the oil market. plus, as crews struggle to reach an oil rig stranded off the coast of alaska. environmentalists are saying this is an example while drilling in the artic is a bad idea. that's ahead on "the fox report." many of my patients still clean their dent
was in pakistan a couple weeks ago, and we heard for ourselves there was political impact and drones and the way they were exploited, very visibly in the uprunning up to the election, and you know the next 30 american women to the drone impact sites and used a powerful attack on american engagement. i wanted to know if you could give reaction to the argument that they are worried that the missile technology control regime is damming the market for drones, and they are looking for some kind of relaxation so, i mean, can you tell us what -- i know what the policy is in relation to drone activity and pakistan, but on the wider use of drones and the extent to which you feel that the system we have is adequate to control, particularly those who supply components. >> well, the controls on the empty fee are, the controls of the exports of uavs are strong, and those capable of traveling beyond the range of only 300 kilometers and carrying a payload above 500 kilograms are subject, as i'm sure you know, to a strong presumption of denial where an advocate of strong control and partners feel that we've ens
an islamic overrun? what does it say about the reach of al qaeda now, not in pakistan or afghanistan, but in this new region, in north africa, and what, if any, policy does the obama administration have to combat? >> i think the algerian -- what we will remember about this week is not the gun measures and gun control proposals and maybe not president obama's second inaugural address for this reason. first of all, al qaeda is not done, unfortunately it has found new territory and the french are going in, to their credit to try and save mali and we are being slow, according to news reports, even providing backup help for them. the fact that -- i want to give them credit, the armed services committee of the house and the senate, would it ever happen in the past that the algerians would have felt they didn't have to let us know they were going in on a hostage rescue mission when americans were held hostage? not just not let us know, why didn't they ask for our help? we have a lot of assets in intelligence, and, we have a lot of well trained people who could become algerians for a day if
girl shot in the head by the taliban in pakistan because she wanted in education. the 15-year-old will undergo a final delicate operation before resuming a there mall life. as abc's nick schifrin reports this survivor is truly an inspiration. >> reporter: it will cover a 3 inch wide hole in her skull, caused three months ago after a taliban gunman shot her point-blank. the bullet passed through the red line. yet she survived. as she recuperated she be came a global icon of courage, elegant advocate for girls' education. and once doctor stephen edmondson is done shaping titanium so it fits her skull she can restart her life. >>kconnoiters the school. it affected her hearing and she will need a cochlear implant. after her surgery she will remain in the hospital for less than a week and will need a year and a half to make a full recovery. at that point with a little luck, doctors say you won't tell the difference between the girl before and after she was shot. nick schifrin, abc news, birmingham, england. >>> well the dream may be over in boca raton, florida. remember the squatte
. and iran and pakistan, other countries have acquired them and we live with them and we tend not to think about them too much. what would it take to get rid of them? the thesis he put out in this, it's guy -- goats doing take some disaster or mishaps before the world really wakes up and says we really need to do something about this. in his fantasy and it really is just a fantasy, it's a thought experiment, not a prediction. in 20 or 25 years, there someone in the pakistan in that ongoing conflict will trigger a nuclear bomb which will set off kind of quasi nuclear winter and do damage to the power gid. when you set off a nuclear bomb, you cause an electromagnetic pulse which can damage power grid. as you know, power grids are essential. significant damage to power grids that can cause a lot of casualties. in his scenario, some small, some minor mishaps occurs. after that people think, gee, this is really serious and we need to get rid of these weapons. at the end of his piece the world is a safer place. the problems of the world are tough. they're not always cheery to contemplate. host:
is captain katie petronia we intervurd her. she served in front line positions in afghanistan and pakistan, and wrote get over it. we're not all created equal. >> i found i broke down and muscle atrophy at a much faster rate and noticeable rate than my male marines. i found myself tripping constantly. my legs buckling, falling during firefights. >> reporter: this is going to be a debate here in the military among the elite units as to whether, whether women will be able to be as physically strong for some of those special operations teams in particular and some of those elite marine units. but secretary panetta and chairman of the joint chiefsmpse announcement later today and the joint chiefs are behind secretary panetta on this. bill: thank you, jennifer griffin, early with us today at the pentagon. martha? martha: pentagon spokesperson releasing this statement on the issue saying, quote, secretary panetta strongly supports these changes. he recognizes over the last decade women have contributed in unprecedented ways to the military's mission. they put their lives on the line to defend th
amount of information about al qaeda in pakistan. the administration continues to use the intelligence every day in drone strikes. it is not just actable intelligence but how they operate. since the program was shut down we have seen the emergence of al qaeda in the arabian peninsula. we have had the emergence of al-shabab merging with al qaeda central. and al qaeda in africa. are we struggling in a way? the information we have on pakistan and the lack of information, is it harder to get the intelligence we need because we do not have this tool? >> one of the most important threads of information that i saw when i got there and still in 2006, late in the game, was detainee information. i already suggested to you that i am willing to adjust the detainee program. we have other penetrations and sources and knowledge. we have a better sense of the imminence of attack, what state of danger we are in as a nation. i told you we entered the black side in 2006. lazy journalists sometimes they we closed them. we did not. we kept the option open for the president. between that date and the time i
-old originally from pakistan who moved to the uk on a student visa and was originally arrested back in 2009 for an alleged plot to alabama a shopping center in manchester england. he was released for lack of evidence but remained on the f.b.i.'s radar. he was extradited last week when his name surfaced into an investigation on a suicide bombing attack on the new york subway system that failed to be pulled off. he is the 8th defendant to face charges in brooklyn for the failed subway plot. you may remember one of his alleged coconspirators who pled guilty back in 2010. he and others were communicating with a shado shadowy al-qaida member. they were e-mailing phrases, such as marriage. he was stopped and the plot was foiled. nasir was using the name language as zazi while communicating with this guy in pack sthapb and was part of this kpheur to commit multiple terrorist attacks and that's why the u.s. attorney in the u.s. was able tow prosecute him. that first appearance scheduled about two hours from now. jenna we'll look forward to developments on that case. thank you. jon: a big take down
in pakistan after coordinated bomb attack that killed 96 people yesterday. religious leaders refusing to bury their dead until the government promises to protect them from further violence. >> jamie: there is a new push to hold syrian leaders responsible for the violence in the country's civil war going on there. 50 countries backing a proposal to the united nations to clear the way for referring members of the assad regime to the war crimes tribunal in the hague. >> gregg: a new concern as the flu outbreak spreads all over the country. there are reports of a shortage of the medication tamiflu. we'll have more on this in just a moment. >> jamie: also this is an interesting story. it's billed as a future of commercial air travel. federal regulators have already raised pretty serious concerns about boeing's 787 dreamliner. she's sweet burks there is problems. they're calling for a comprehensive review of the design, the manufacturing and the assembly process of the plane after a string of frightening incidents. dominic with the latest from our los angeles bureau. tell us what is the latest? >>
commander who reportedly was at odds with other taliban leaders about attacking pakistan. >>> mark kirk returns to washington a year after a major stroke. he has spent the past 12 months learning to walk again. today he plans to climb the steps of the capitol building and get back to work. he says one of his priorities is medicaid funding for stroke victims who have no income. >>> the colorado movie theater where those 12 people were shot and killed last somerset to umm reopen in two weeks from today. some relatives plan to boycott. they claim the theater company never sent condolences. they say this invitation to a special memorial is just insulting. the theater has been closed ever since the shootings back july 20th. the preliminary hearing for the suspect starts next week. >> a lot of raw emotion there. >>> a medical helicopter crashing late last night near clear lake, iowa, killing at least three people on board. at this point very little is known about what happened. federal investigators are now headed to the scene. meanwhile, another medical helicopter crashed yesterday near semi
this morning. police in pakistan say five female teachers are dead after being ambushed. the women were working for a non-governmental organizations on the way to a community center. two health workers were killed. the attack happened in a province where many militants oppose female education. an update on secretary of state hillary clinton. doctors say she is making excellent progress at new york presbyterian hospital with a blood clot in her head. doctors say they are confident the blood thinners will dissolve blood clot and she will make a full recovery. new laws taking effect across the country today, and in maryland, same-sex couples were greeted with cheers and noisemakers as gay marriage became legal in the first state south of the mason-dixon line. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> anxiety, dread, fear, what would happen january 1, 1863 when the emancipation proclamation was signed. many people spent three months those 100 days, begging the president, but do not do it, retract it. you still have time to step back. part of what i would like to do is tell you some
about the a rather good aid, but on pakistan, republicans and democrats a we need to payback that aid. rand paul has really been pushing that. others like senator john mccain say we cannot just cut them off. foreign aid is very important if you want to get them to do what we want them to do and foster democracy. guest: before we let you go, bob cusack, we'll take another phone call. tell us about the freshman class and who are some names, faces people should be looking out for, people might make a name for themselves. guest: senator tim kaine is a democrat from virginia. he defeated george allen in the election. he is a former governor. this is very close to president obama. he was almost vice-president. talk about your money in the senate. elizabeth warren won a huge battle with senator scott brown. how will she going to operate? the financial industry is a little bit nervous about her. she had the idea to come up with the consumer bureau that was so controversial, the agency that is now up and running as far as wall street reform. those two have strong personalities. they could also
: your parents immigrated to the u.s.? where are they from? guest: there from pakistan. at the end of the day, defining "american" is defining who we are as a society. it is up to congress to get together and fix the problem. host: "the immigration system is not working. it is broke into the corps, and there is a massive problem for the government." and other tweet says, "what about the rule that would have a -- it would have required employers to act when they got a no match letter from social security?" guest: the bush administration issued a rule that when employers got a letter from social security saying that the name and the number do not match or the number is fake or something, look into it, and here you are we are letting you know, the rule said they had to pursue a certain number of steps. if those various things do not resolve it, they had to let the guy go. what happened was that the unholy alliance of the aclu, the u.s. chamber of commerce, and the afl-cio sued that rule because they knew it when identify illegal immigrants in the work force. they succeeded in stopping
was in pakistan and afghanistan a few years ago and we were consulting over the phone. he played an instrumental role in working with president karzai at that time to accept the results of the election and to move forward. hi to call harry reid and ask harry not to schedule any votes so john could see that mission through. but that's what he does. he's a determined and effective representative of the united states, has been as a senator, will be as secretary. let me close by saying that leading our diplomats and development experts is a great honor and every day, as i testified yesterday, i've seen firsthand their skill, their bravery, unwavering commitment to our country. i've been proud to call them colleagues and to serve as secretary of state and i'm very pleased that john will be given the chance, subject to confirmation, to continue the work of a lifetime on behalf of our country. thank you. >> thank you, madam secretary. senator mccain? >> mr. chairman, i'm pleased to be here with secretary warren and secretary clinton to introduce and speak, say a few words about my friend, senator kerry
pakistan is probably saying they want grown attacks but publicly they have denounced them. these are acts of war under any definition. we cannot believe that, as a country, has unilateral status. it is called american exceptional lesson. what the rest of the world hears is hypocrisy when we say we have a right to use our drones whenever we think our national interests are at stake. i recently spoke to the parliamentarians of nato. these parliamentarians were very supportive of american drone policy and many of the nato countries are developing their own programs. i asked in english baroness, what will she say when china or iran vaporizes someone on the london bridge because they believe they are a threat to their country? what would you possibly say to object when the argument for drones that we now have the authority to take out anyone or anything in other countries that threaten us? it is anathema under international law. after world war two, we developed an international law that developed stability where countries have to take steps before they go to war. they cannot act unilaterally.
brennan, who served under him, 390 in the past decade in pakistan and yemen, and 340 of those were under obama and brennan, while brennan was serving him. what does that say? is brennan partly responsible for these drone attacks? what does that say about, people are very critical of these drone attacks. >> well success has many fathers and controversy has feuders, the drone attacks brings both. this process was fathered and naureur ud by mike hayden when he was the director of the cia at the very tail end of the bush administration. john brennan comes in at the beginning of the obama administration and builds white house policy and process around it. that's also one of the reasons there are few al qaeda leaders walking around today. >> we've gone from leon panetta to david petraeus briefly and now if john brennan is confirmed, john brennan. is the cia changing? >> the cia has changed drastically drastically, charlie. one of the discussions about john brennan is going to be aside from the counterterrorism paramilitary and drone world they have to get back to re
say about the drug is being dropped on the brothers and sisters in pakistan and somalia and yemen -- the drones being dropped? my voice hollers out, and do not take it with your hand on his bible. what would you say about the poverty in america now beginning with the children and the elderly and our working folks in all colors? not just here, around the world. do not hide and conceal his challenge. as much as i'm glad that barack obama won -- i think that brother mitt romney would have been a catastrophe -- brother newt told the truth about vampire capitalism, but that is the system as a whole. but when barack obama attempts to use that rich tradition of so many struggling to produce that voice that pushed martin in the direction that it did, i get upset. people say we are hating obama. no, we are living the tradition that produced martin luther king jr., and we will not allow it to be sanitized, deodorize, sterilized. we want the subversive power to be heard. that is what we think when he said he is going to put his hand on that bible. [applause] and i'm praying for him. i'm pray
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